FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 12, 2021

Contact: Hannah Packman, 303.819.8737
hpackman@nfudc.org

WASHINGTON – As the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) updates its greenhouse gas emissions standards for passenger vehicles and light duty trucks, a coalition of farm, biofuels, and environmental organizations is urging the administration to propose a higher octane fuel standard.

In a letter sent today to President Joe Biden, the group – which includes National Farmers Union (NFU) and several of its state divisions –  also requested that EPA open a comment period on the role that high octane low carbon (HOLC) fuels can play in advancing the administration’s “climate, environmental justice, public health, economic revitalization, and energy security objectives.” They noted that the Alliance for Automotive Innovation (AAI), which manufactures 99 percent of affected vehicles, also supports a transition to HOLC fuels.

NFU President Rob Larew expanded on the coalition’s priorities in a statement:

“High octane, low carbon fuels, including higher-level blends of ethanol, hold so much potential – and we should be doing everything we can to realize that potential. These fuels improve vehicle and fuel efficiency, which in turn can reduce greenhouse gas emissions, improve air quality, conserve oil, and strengthen energy security. That alone should be plenty of justification for the EPA to introduce a higher octane fuel standard. But the benefits go far beyond that – high octane fuels also drive economic growth and create new jobs in rural communities, slash pump prices for drivers, and open new markets for farmers. Given these many advantages, there’s really no reason the administration shouldn’t increase octane levels in fuel.”

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About NFU
National Farmers Union advocates on behalf of nearly 200,000 American farm families and their communities. We envision a world in which farm families and their communities are respected, valued, and enjoy economic prosperity and social justice.

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